Home » Wheat Belly Friendly: Gluten Free Low Carb - Guide With Anti-Ageing Anti-Oxidant 170 Recipes by Judy Carter
Wheat Belly Friendly: Gluten Free Low Carb - Guide With Anti-Ageing Anti-Oxidant 170 Recipes Judy Carter

Wheat Belly Friendly: Gluten Free Low Carb - Guide With Anti-Ageing Anti-Oxidant 170 Recipes

Judy Carter

Published October 8th 2013
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
384 pages
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 About the Book 

You have to watch your carbohydrate intake and many gluten-free products are very high in carbs .and if you simply replace your favorite cookies, cakes, breads and pastas with gluten free alternatives you aren’t really saving any calories or carbs.MoreYou have to watch your carbohydrate intake and many gluten-free products are very high in carbs .and if you simply replace your favorite cookies, cakes, breads and pastas with gluten free alternatives you aren’t really saving any calories or carbs. In fact, some of these replacements may even be higher in calories,fat and carbs than what you were eating earlier! After all, gluten free products are typically marketed to those with celiac disease, (who have gluten intolerance) and are not being marketed as a weight loss or low cholesterol low fat food.Regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration of the United States and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have published guidance disallowing food product labels to claim an inferred antioxidant benefit when no such physiological evidence exists.With the help of this book you will be able cook healthy gluten free low carb recipes which have atleast one natural Anti-oxidant ingredient.All recipes also include detailed information on calories, fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates, protein, fiber and sodium, as well as serving sizes and cooking time.Vitamin A (retinol), also synthesized by the body from beta-carotene, protects dark green, yellow and orange vegetables and fruits from solar radiation damage, and is thought to play a similar role in the human body. Carrots, squash, broccoli, sweet potatoes, tomatoes (which gain their color from the compound lycopene), kale, mangoes, oranges, seabuckthorn berries, wolfberries (goji), collards, cantaloupe, peaches and apricots are particularly rich sources of beta-carotene, the major provitamin A carotenoid.Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble compound that fulfills several roles in living systems. Important sources include citrus fruits (such as oranges, sweet lime, etc.), green peppers, broccoli, green leafy vegetables, black currants, strawberries, blueberries, seabuckthorn, raw cabbage and tomatoes. Linus Pauling was a major advocate for its use.Vitamin E, including tocotrienol and tocopherol, is fat soluble and protects lipids. Sources include wheat germ, seabuckthorn, nuts, seeds, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, kiwifruit, vegetable oil, and fish-liver oil. Alpha-tocopherol is the main form in which vitamin E is consumed. Recent studies showed that some tocotrienol isomers have significant anti-oxidant properties.Alpha-carotene - found in carrots, winter squash, tomatoes, green beans, cilantro, Swiss chardAstaxanthin - found naturally in red algae and animals higher in the marine food chain. It is a red pigment familiarly recognized in crustacean shells and salmon flesh/roe.Beta-carotene - found in high concentrations in butternut squash, carrots, orange bell peppers, pumpkins, kale, peaches, apricots, mango, turnip greens, broccoli, spinach, and sweet potatoes.Canthaxanthin Lutein - found in high concentration in spinach, kale, Swiss chard, collard greens, beet and mustard greens, endive, red pepper and okraLycopene - found in high concentration in cooked red tomato products like canned tomatoes, tomato sauce, tomato juice and garden cocktails, gauva and watermelons.Zeaxanthin - best sources are kale, collard greens, spinach, turnip greens, spinach, Swiss chard, mustard and beet greens, corn, and broccoli